Pools and Hot Tubs

Swimming pools and hot tubs use a great deal of energy, resulting in higher electric bills. Pool pumps, for example, can use more energy and cost more to run than all your home appliances combined.

Connexus Energy suggests these energy-saving practices for home hot tubs and swimming pools.

Hot Tubs

  • Set the hot tub thermostat between 100°F and 102°F, as recommended by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Most hot tubs have a factory setting of 104°F.
  • Create a windbreak with privacy panels, shrubs, or fencing to prevent the wind from cooling your water.
  • A floating thermal blanket will help retain heat and reduce the amount of moisture buildup on the inside of your hard cover, extending its life.
  • Use a well-insulated hard foam cover. Make sure the cover and tub lip fit snugly.
  • Keep the cover in good condition. Most heat loss occurs through the spa cover. Replace the cover if the interior foam breaks or becomes saturated.
  • Change the water in your hot tub every 3-4 months. At this time, flush the plumbing system and clean or replace the filter to maintain appropriate water circulation and reduce the strain on the pump motor.

Swimming Pools

  • Set the pool thermostat to 78°F. Raising the temperature by even one degree Fahrenheit can increase energy costs an additional 10 to 30 percent.
  • Use of a solar cover can add up to 10°F, and helps lessen the time your pool heater runs.
  • Follow the manufacturer-recommended circulation times. Generally, eight hours a day is sufficient. Adjust as necessary.
  • A variable speed pump will provide the most energy efficiency.

Save even more with a variable speed pool pump rebate from Connexus Energy.